Propagating Hydangrangeas Could Be Easier Than You Think

blue flowers
Create another shrub easily.

Most people think of starting a new hydrangea plant from a cutting, but I am talking about propagating by root or ground layering here – and it’s especially easy if it’s been done for you by mother nature.

My new yard has no hydrangeas, except for the tiny ones I planted this fall. But the duplex I rented for three years had a large, beautiful bush right outside my front window.

As I was weeding around it one spring I found a low hanging branch that had rooted itself into the dirt. I dug it up (with permission from the landlady) and replanted it near the front steps.

The following year she had another little hydrangea shrub to decorate her yard – for free! All it took was digging and watering.  It’s an easy, and super cheap, way to increase the beauty of your landscape.  And you’ll know exactly what you are getting!

Read the full story with photos by clicking here.  And check those low lying branches this Spring – it’s coming.

Lots of Growth on The New Hydrangea Shrub

hydrangea shrub
The New Shrub is Thriving

I’m so happy to add this picture of the new hydrangea shrub. It’s growing like mad and has buds all over it! One of the great things about hydrangea plants is that they are hardy and fill out quickly. If you look back at my other posts you will see just how quickly this one grew. Last year it consisted of two stalks of leaves with no flowers, and although it didn’t look like it was doing much, I’ll bet that underground the root system was expanding and strengthening to support the wealth of growth for the following year – which is now!

That is why you will sometimes hear to not let certain plants bloom the first year. Blooming takes a lot of energy which takes away from the plants ability to become strong. And a good, sturdy plant is needed to produce great flowers. Hydrangeas seem to be “smart enough” to do this on their own. At least that is how it seems to me.

Hydrangeas and The Rainy, Cold Summer

Hydrangea bud
End of June Hydrangea Bud

It’s the end of June and in southwestern New Hampshire the hydrangea in my yard is full of buds. The bush is very full this year since I didn’t do any cutting back, but the overall color is not the dark green of the leaves you see in this photo. In fact the bush seems to be divided with part of the stems showing off dark greenery and the rest showing a lighter, less healthy looking green.

The disadvantage I have where I live is that this yard is not mine. I live in a duplex and the owner lives next to me. She goes out and fertilizes with something – seaweed I think – and so I have to be careful of what I add to the plant. I usually just keep it watered and see what happens. Last year the blooms were not as nicely colored as the year before and the flowers were also smaller.

This year is also the first time I have seen browning of the leaves. You can see it in my photo below. So I had to check on diseases of hydrangeas and found that they can get spots on the leaves.  However, that site didn’t say why or what to do about them. The leaves in some places, look like something is eating them.

As I have said, it’s not my yard and not my plant, so I’m not worrying too much about it. My landlady is not much of a gardener so I doubt that she even notices or cares. I’ll keep an eye on it and see what happens, but it might have something to do with the fact that we are having a rainy and cold spring and summer season this year. In fact, I have hardly been outside!

I’m looking out for the flowers. I hope they open before I move in July.

hydrangea shrub with light and dark leaves
Dark and Light Leaves and Brown Spots