Multi-Color Hydrangea Blooms

I am not familiar with all types of hydrangeas, but I do know that almost all blooms change color at some point. These multi-color hydrangea blooms show how pretty the hydrangea flower can become along the timeline of it’s life.

This first picture is mine.  The blue buds of Endless Summer hydrangeas come out as cream color then eventually turn bright blue, if the soil is acidic enough.  As summer ends, the flowers may turn other colors, like green or pinkish purple.  Eventually they will dry on the stem.
blue hydrangea bud

As a flower fades, or goes by, it can become most beautiful.  The blue petals can turn purple and green.  I am not sure if this is what happened in the picture below, but I’ve seen my own blue hydrangeas fade to the most stunning and unique colors.  Late summer hydrangeas that have turned green are my favorite.
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Late in the growing season – into fall – hydrangeas can dry right on the stem. Dried flowers can be just about as lovely as the fresh blooms.

dried green and purple hydrangea flower
All of the flowers pictured here are of the macrophylla variety, with big, round blooms.
pink bud of the hydrangea
If your soil is more alkaline, mophead hydrangeas can be pink instead of blue.
blue hydrangea with green
The long life of the hydrangea flower makes it a popular choice as a perennial for the landscape. Once it begins to flower, you can enjoy those huge blooms for months.
dark purple hydrangea flowers with some blue
Thanks to Pixabay for most of these pretty floral images.

Endless Summer Goes From Blue to Lavender, Pink or Green

lavender hydrangea flower
This flower bloomed blue then faded to lavender

My beautiful blue Endless Summer hydrangea flower turned to light lavender as last season progressed. Sometimes the blues turn pink, or even green. It’s what makes growing hydrangeas so exciting, the fact that flowers will start out one color and turn to something completely different.

I love this gorgeous light purple flower. The newly planted shrub is not very large and last year it had only about 5 or 6 blooms. The heavy weight of the flowers on the smaller stems weighed them down, but each year the plant will do better.

Right now it’s too early to see much happening with my hydrangea bushes. I keep coming across pictures I took last summer and fall, so I’ll have to share those for the time being.

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Endless Summer that has turned light green in Fall
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A blue flower drying on the stem in Autumn turns all kinds of gorgeous colors

I won’t be buying any more new plants, as I am currently on a very tight budget, but I plan to propagate hydrangeas from the plants I already have.

Propagating from the endless summer and mop-head varieties is easy, but it takes time and some planning.  Some people start plants from cuttings, but I have not had luck with that.