The Pinky Winky Hydrangea Bush

Pinky winky hydrangea
The Pink and White “Pinky Winky”

The nursery I visited recently in Wilton, NH had a nice variety of hydrangeas ready to buy. With the exception of the tree variety hydrangea, all were together under a greenhouse dome and there were many to choose from the first of this week.

I couldn’t resist getting this Pinky Winky hydrangea (Paniculata) and I sure hope it likes living in my yard. The flowers will be elongated, white- changing to pink, according to the photo on the big tag.

I haven’t had time to get it into the ground yet because we have been getting some nice rain.  Also I am not sure exactly where to put it.

This is my first Spring in my new place so I have been watching the sun – on the days it cooperates – to see which areas get the most.

I think that this one will like some sun but to be shaded from the heat of the day so the front (east-facing) area should work.  Also it will grow to be quite large so it will fill in the front bare spots nicely.

I need to order some garden dirt for the entire front garden area, since most of the topsoil has eroded away it seems.

All About the Pinky Winky

Hydrangea 'Pinky Winky' The Pinky Winky hydrangea is not one you will easily forget. The flowers are pretty shades of pink and white and the shrub itself can be eight feet tall. Plant this one someplace where it has room to branch out. It is a paniculata and is a sister of sorts to the “Limelight” hydrangea which also has cone shaped flowers, but they turn a light green.

Paniculatas are hardy and the flowers form on new wood – or new stems, and that means the pruning – if needed – should be done in late winter or very early Spring before the new buds set. This shrub will bloom in summer and into Fall, like many hydrangea varieties.

As you can see from the photo I’ve added (not mine), the blooms start off mostly white and fill out along the tall spire, shaped like a Christmas tree.  Later the flowers will change color to pink.  See a good picture of them at the Proven Winners site.

Remember to plant this one in either sun or partial shade, but the ground should be moist and cool.  That is what most hydrangeas seem to like.

I look forward to growing my own this year, and then I’ll add my own photos.