Hydrangea Frosted Cupcakes

blue and purple flower
Make a Cupcake To Match The Colors of This Flower

If you love to bake and have the time to decoratively frost your own cupcakes, try this simple and pretty idea for making hydrangea cupcakes.

I’m always on the lookout for a rare site or blog that shows (with great pictures) how to make hydrangea related goodies.

These hydrangea frosted cupcakes, from the awesome site “Glorious Treats”, are so cute and relatively simple to create.  They combine the pretty blue and lavender colors commonly found on hydrangea flowers, but the color of the frosting is up to the baker.  Try out various color combinations to make realistic-looking sweet treats.  Blue and lavender or purple is a common color scheme to see on hydrangea flowers, or white with light pink.  If you are clever with the icing, you may even find a way to create the light green shades that are so coveted.

Serve them up at a birthday party or bridal shower and I’m sure they’ll be a huge hit.  Yum!

Lots of Growth on The New Hydrangea Shrub

hydrangea shrub
The New Shrub is Thriving

I’m so happy to add this picture of the new hydrangea shrub. It’s growing like mad and has buds all over it! One of the great things about hydrangea plants is that they are hardy and fill out quickly. If you look back at my other posts you will see just how quickly this one grew. Last year it consisted of two stalks of leaves with no flowers, and although it didn’t look like it was doing much, I’ll bet that underground the root system was expanding and strengthening to support the wealth of growth for the following year – which is now!

That is why you will sometimes hear to not let certain plants bloom the first year. Blooming takes a lot of energy which takes away from the plants ability to become strong. And a good, sturdy plant is needed to produce great flowers. Hydrangeas seem to be “smart enough” to do this on their own. At least that is how it seems to me.

Hydrangeas and The Rainy, Cold Summer

Hydrangea bud
End of June Hydrangea Bud

It’s the end of June and in southwestern New Hampshire the hydrangea in my yard is full of buds. The bush is very full this year since I didn’t do any cutting back, but the overall color is not the dark green of the leaves you see in this photo. In fact the bush seems to be divided with part of the stems showing off dark greenery and the rest showing a lighter, less healthy looking green.

The disadvantage I have where I live is that this yard is not mine. I live in a duplex and the owner lives next to me. She goes out and fertilizes with something – seaweed I think – and so I have to be careful of what I add to the plant. I usually just keep it watered and see what happens. Last year the blooms were not as nicely colored as the year before and the flowers were also smaller.

This year is also the first time I have seen browning of the leaves. You can see it in my photo below. So I had to check on diseases of hydrangeas and found that they can get spots on the leaves.  However, that site didn’t say why or what to do about them. The leaves in some places, look like something is eating them.

As I have said, it’s not my yard and not my plant, so I’m not worrying too much about it. My landlady is not much of a gardener so I doubt that she even notices or cares. I’ll keep an eye on it and see what happens, but it might have something to do with the fact that we are having a rainy and cold spring and summer season this year. In fact, I have hardly been outside!

I’m looking out for the flowers. I hope they open before I move in July.

hydrangea shrub with light and dark leaves
Dark and Light Leaves and Brown Spots

Baby Hydrangea In Second Year After Propagation

Hydrangea planting
New Plant - Second Year

Want to see my baby?  This little hydrangea bush was propagated from a large one.

Sometime in the summer of 2009 I noticed that the big, blue hydrangea plant in my front yard had a “baby” growing next to it. It didn’t have a bloom, so I dug it up and put it by the front steps.

**Note: I’ve since read that before digging up a new plant, first chop it from the “mother” plant and then leave it where it is for a while to let it get accustomed to growing on it’s own. After a month or so it’s safe to dig it up and it will be more ready for life out on it’s own!

Anyway, it is thriving and even has little buds showing this year. Last year, summer of 2010, it grew two long stalks, but no flowers. I was worried about it this winter with all the snow we had, but the brown stalks were still there once the snow was gone and leaves began to grown from it quickly. Besides new growth on the stalks, it is filling in with more stems and I look forward to seeing the flowers of course and am a bit curious what color they will be. I am thinking blue.

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