Greenhouse Hydrangea With Blue Flowers Forming

At Home Depot I spotted a table with small hydrangeas for sale. I call it a “greenhouse” hydrangea because I imagine that is where it came from. The price was around $12 as I recall, so I bought one. Now I know these are not like the hydrangea plants I purchased in New Hampshire to plant in my northern yard.

The tag on this one said it “likes cool nights” and it’s climate preference is 50-70 F. That’s what “cool” is in Florida. It’s also listed as a Houseplant. This plant obviously can’t take wintering in a dormant stage over several months. Growing hydrangeas this way is new to me.

hydrangea plant with buds
New hydrangea plant
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At Last I Have a Fiddleleaf Fig Tree!

It is January, and the weather has cooled off nicely here in central Florida.  The windows are open, and it’s a pleasure to be outdoors.  Finally I wanted to shop for plants because walking through the nursery was fun!

Christmas spending is over and I decided to add a few essential plants to my home.  I traveled to Lindley’s Garden Center in New Smyrna and bought a little Staghorn Fern which is hanging under the Brazilian pepper trees in my backyard.

For inside the house I added a little thyme plant to the kitchen windowsill – a necessity for cooking – and a Fiddleleaf Fig tree to the dining room.  Yes, I have a Fig Tree!  I have wanted one for a very long time, and finally splurged on this beauty.  Now I need to find a suitable decorative pot to complete the look.  I’m in the process of finding the perfect pot.

fiddle leaf fig tree
My new Fiddle leaf fig tree

If this fig tree looks familiar, I wouldn’t be surprised. It is used often as backdrop greenery for commercials, tv shows, and movies.  You can hardly watch any show or read any magazine without seeing one somewhere in the background.  If you are a fan of the Fixer Upper show, Joanna uses them often when decorating finished homes. The gorgeous fiddle-shaped leaves grow in bunches from a straight trunk to create a tall, textured green space.   Various size trees can be grouped together to make a big accent area, but single trees are enough to decorate any room with interest.  They can grow tall without being overwhelming, and the combination of stalks and fat leaves is such fun.  Smaller trees can even go on countertops or tables. If my house was larger, I would have many of these trees scattered about.  As it is, I could barely find room for just one.

At Lindley’s I paid $39.50 for this tree which is about 4 feet tall.  Mind you the pot is nothing special.  To get it home I set it on the floor of the passenger side of my Subaru and tilted it back toward the seat.  I did have to grab the pot  as I went around corners as it wanted to roll, but no leaves broke off- phew.   I got it home safely and am so pleased to finally have this tree to enjoy.

How to Care For the Fiddle-leaf Fig Tree

After a day or two I took the tree outside and sprayed it down with the hose.  I added a little fish fertilizer and watered it good.  I am lucky to live in a tropical location because these trees love sunlight (filtered, not direct) and warmth (with humidity thrown in).  Because of this, I have a good chance of keeping this tree happy and healthy.  I can give it some playtime outside now and then, which I do with all my houseplants.

I’m not sure how well a Fiddleleaf Fig would fare in a northern climate, but the HGTV website has some advice for those of you who would like to try to grow one.

Fig Tree Artwork

One afternoon I decided to draw the fig tree. After I finished the drawing I uploaded it and used Pixelmater to remove the background and add color. Then I played around with the image and used it to create artwork for sale in my Zazzle store, Clara’s Desk. Below is the poster I made.

Hand drawn fiddle leaf fig in baskets on poster paper
My drawing as a poster for sale in my online store.