Identifying Perennials in Spring

Pictures of perennials as an identification guide to what’s growing in my yard this spring.

Once the perennials start pushing through the ground in spring, I sometimes can’t recall what is growing where.  I spent nearly 30 years living in Florida where plants don’t have to hibernate over winter.  Now I’ve had to adjust to not seeing my yard and gardens for months at a time.

Even though I leave the tags near the plant when they are planted, the tags don’t always last.  Some of the larger perennials, like the hydrangeas and peonies are easy to identify.  I also know where the rhododendrons are as they don’t die back.  They are just chewed to nubs by the deer.  This year I discovered that deer eat lilacs too.  We’ve had a hard winter.  I can’t be too mad at them for needing to eat.  I just wish they’d eat plants in another yard and leave mine alone!

I’ve taken some recent photos of the perennials growing this Spring as a reminder of what’s growing where.  It’s a plant identification guide for myself.  Maybe they will help you name some in your yard as well.

I took these photos May 3, 2015.  I live in southwestern New Hampshire.

ID bleeding heart ID Columbine plant in spring ID Coneflower ID Coral Bells ID coral bells2 ID Corepsis ID Monk's Hood ID tall phlox ID wild bleeding heart

Some of My Blue Flower Pictures

blue hydrangea flower
Blue Hydrangeas

If you are looking for blue flower pictures – I mean REAL blue flowers, today I am showing off some of mine.

How many times have you seen a purple flower listed as being blue. In the flower kingdom, this happens a lot and I think it is because there really aren’t that many true blue flowers.

It’s a popular color, especially for weddings – that “something blue” phrase can be taken care of with a blue bouquet or at least one blue flower in the mix.

Blue flowers are popular in the landscape too. The perennials that come in blue are certain types of hydrangea (pictured), such as the “Endless Summer” variety.  But soil must be acidic for flowers to be nice and blue.

I also love the forget-me-not, which sports tiny bright blue petals with yellow and white centers.

Forget Me Not Floral Photography Postage stampLots of gardeners include the blue delphinium that grows tall, and many like to have a morning glory vine grow along the deck railing or up the fencepost.  I have another page with more ♥ pictures of blue flowers you could grow in your garden.

Another flower I grow that is sometimes blue is the Columbine.  I love the variety of that plant and I’ve had light blue flowers, but the more common color is dark purple, as you can see in my photo below.  My images are not free to use, so please contact me if you want to use one, with a link back to my blog.

Blue Columbine Postcard postcard